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Coca-Cola Launching Hot Ginger Ale Can

Coca-Cola Launching Hot Ginger Ale Can


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Apparently Coca-Cola is launching a hot ginger ale can in Japan

Would you try a hot ginger ale?

We can always rely on the Japanese soda market to introduce surprising soda flavors, but hot soda? PSFK reports that Coca-Cola is launching a heated ginger ale in Japan, using a can that will heat up the drink when shaken and placed upright.

Of course, heated drinks are already popular in Japan, especially when the weather gets colder; hot coffee and tea drinks are already sold in vending machines, including Coca-Cola's Georgia coffee brand, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

The first heated soda, however, is reportedly a carbonated drink with ginger extract, apple, and cinnamon flavors. No word on when these will hit the States, but while the idea of a hot soda sounds strange, we can only imagine the possibilities come winter. A hot whiskey-ginger or a hot toddy variation? Yep, sounds right up our alley. The Canada Dry Ginger Ale cans hit Japanese markets Oct. 21, for 120 yen (or about $1.20).


10 Reasons Vernors Ginger Ale Is The Best Drink You've Never Heard Of

If you live in Michigan, you might have had one of these to drink in the last few weeks. But if you live anywhere else, you probably have no idea what Vernors is.

The simple answer? Ginger ale. But it's so, so much better. Originally from Detroit, it's a soda (though you're more likely to hear "pop" where it's found) that Michiganders swear by. It also has loyal fans in Florida and some parts of the Midwest, but can be difficult to find elsewhere. So if you happen to find a Vernors at your local store, here are 10 reasons it's absolutely worth a try:

1. It's actually REALLY delicious.

Vernors has a tangy but not-too-strong ginger flavor, a touch of vanilla and serious carbonation, enough that it can sting if you're not prepared. It's a little like a gingery cream soda, and makes Canada Dry taste like Sprite by comparison. Vernors won a Serious Eats ginger ale taste test a few years ago -- we can't say we're surprised.

2. Vernors has a long history -- it might even be the oldest surviving soda in America.

Now owned by the Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Vernors was first made in the late 1800s. According to company history, it was invented in 1866, though Serious Eats notes its 1911 trademark application says it first entered the market 1880. Either way, that's pretty old -- older than Coca-Cola or Dr Pepper.

3. It was invented by a perfectionist pharmacist and Civil War vet, and like anything good, its origin story is shrouded in doubt and tall tales.

According to company lore, James Vernor was experimenting with syrups to replicate Irish ginger ales while he was working at a drug store in Detroit. Then, he was called to serve in the Civil War in 1862. When he got back four years later, though, he tried his concoction, aged in an oak cask, and found it better than before -- he called it "deliciously different." Vernors was born.

However, his son and others have questioned that story. It's more likely that Vernor came up with the idea during the war, or right after it, and then made his signature soda.

Vernor was reportedly exacting when it came to his ginger ale, and for a long time it could only be found at the pharmacy he opened. It did eventually spread to other soda fountains in Detroit, where Vernor gave owners pamphlets with strict instructions on how it should be sold.

4. You can get it as a Slurpee now.

If 7-Eleven makes a drink into a Slurpee, you know it must be good. Last week, 7-Eleven announced Vernors is their first regional Slurpee launch, selling the Vernors Slurpees in all Michigan 7-Elevens. Without the intense carbonation, it doesn't have the same kick as a regular Vernors, but devotees still cannot get over their excitement.


Product Lauch: Canada Dry Hot Ginger Ale

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola is launching a first among its scores of beverage selections: a heated carbonated drink.

After four years of development, Coca-Cola Japan is putting a “hot” Canada Dry Ginger Ale in vending machines beginning Oct. 21. The company managed to maintain the carbonation during the heating process.

The company said spiced hot drinks are popular in Japan, especially during colder months. Coca-Cola’s new offering features a ginger extract combined with apple and cinnamon flavors.

While Coke’s new product will come out heated, new hot can technology for drinks and soups is also gaining popularity in this country.

Hot Can Inc. is one of the companies behind the technology, according to Gizmag.com, which described the company’s heat-activation process:

“The double-chambered aluminum Hot Can contains the beverage or soup in its outer chamber, and a mix of water and calcium oxide in its inner chamber. When activated, the water and calcium oxide mix, causing an exothermic reaction that heats the beverage. A polypropylene outer shell insulates the beverage for about 45 minutes and protects the hands from burns.” A button on the can pressed, the can is shaken and then it is placed upright until it heats up.

The 180-milliliter, heated Canada Dry Ginger Ale will sell for 120 Japanese yen, or about $1.20.


Try It You Might Like It

Last week I had chicken on the menu but didn’t know what recipe I was going to make. I had a 2 liter bottle of ginger ale going flat in the fridge and made a quick decision to marinate the chicken in a ginger ale mixture and grill it. Lo and behold my entire family liked it. Bribery was involved slightly because I promised that each of the kids could have a glass of ginger ale if they ate all their chicken. They were both rewarded with the drink and they both said that they liked the chicken.

So this weekend I asked my husband if we could try out Coca-Cola Chicken and he said “You might as well.” While that was not the enthusiasm I was looking for at least he wasn’t complaining. We all decided that we liked the Ginger Ale Chicken better but now I know that flat soda (pop) can be used for marinating chicken. The photo at the top is the Coca-Cola chicken and since the results look very similar I am grouping these recipes together.

Coca-Cola Chicken Marinade

  • 4 oz Coca-Cola (half a can)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • Juice from half a lime
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

Coca-Cola chicken marinade

Ginger-Ale Chicken Marinade

  • 1/2 cup ginger ale
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1-2 Tbsp fresh grated ginger

Ginger ale chicken marinade

Mix the ingredients for the marinade in a glass dish and add 4 boneless chicken breasts. Poke the chicken a few times with a fork and place the bowl in the fridge for at least 3o minutes or up to 4 hours.

Grill the chicken until cooked thoroughly discarding the excess marinade.

The Ginger-Ale Chicken was very flavorful mostly because of the extra ginger added to the marinade. It was a hit with the whole family.

The kids didn’t need to be bribed to eat the Coca-Cola Chicken but they needed to have it seasoned with salt to eat it. I ended up making my Grilled Sweet Potatoes for my side dish and the honey-lime-ginger dressing from the potatoes seeped over to my chicken. That addition made it lovely but I still liked the Ginger Ale Chicken more.


Fall is right around the corner, and winter is around the corner after that, and after that… wait, back up, you’re just going to end up in the same place you started. Let’s focus on fall.

Fall in Japan, like every season in Japan, is a chance for companies to come up with new seasonal convenience store items with fancy color-coded packages. And in summer’s case, tons and tons of salt. In the fall, especially, manufacturers gear up with all kinds of crazy concoctions because it’s (probably) a verifiable fact that everybody eats like a damn starved pig in the fall and they know you’ll eat or drink just about anything if they put some pretty fall leaves on the package.

Enter Coca Cola’s hot Canada Dry ginger ale, which actually lacks leaves on the package – a severe marketing oversight – but does feature some cool technology to keep the carbonation from getting all wonky when heating up the drink. In addition to mad science-ing the carbonation to be just right, the drink also features a new recipe that cranks up the ginger and other spices to better suit the cold fall and winter months.

The new drink will run 120 yen (US$1.20) and goes on sale October 21, which is a little later than the competition for fall specialties, but let’s cut them some slack. From the sound of it, they’ve put a lot of thought and countless hours into concocting the perfect hot ginger ale recipe.


Would you drink hot ginger ale from a can? Coca Cola thinks you will

Fall in Japan, like every season in Japan, is a chance for companies to come up with new seasonal convenience store items with fancy color-coded packages. And in summer’s case, tons and tons of salt. In the fall, especially, manufacturers gear up with all kinds of crazy concoctions because it’s (probably) a verifiable fact that everybody eats like a damn starved pig in the fall and they know you’ll eat or drink just about anything if they put some pretty fall leaves on the package.

Enter Coca Cola’s hot Canada Dry ginger ale, which actually lacks leaves on the package – a severe marketing oversight – but does feature some cool technology to keep the carbonation from getting all wonky when heating up the drink. In addition to mad science-ing the carbonation to be just right, the drink also features a new recipe that cranks up the ginger and other spices to better suit the cold fall and winter months.

The new drink will run 120 yen and goes on sale Oct 21, which is a little later than the competition for fall specialties, but let’s cut them some slack. From the sound of it, they’ve put a lot of thought and countless hours into concocting the perfect hot ginger ale recipe.

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Special edition Coca Cola made with Okinawan water -- This Could Be your Dream Home – If You’re a Goldfish! -- You’ll want to visit Shibuya Hikarie just to use the ladies’ room!


Hot Cherry Egg Bounce

From The Dispenser Soda Water Guide, c 1909

One egg, 2 ounces cherry juice, 1 spoonful powdered sugar. Mix thoroughly and mix again while adding hot water. Add several cherries and a slice of orange. Serve with nutmeg.

  • Taste the drink after adding the hot water and adjust the amount of cherry juice and sugar as necessary to get a pleasant sweet-tart flavor.
  • Canned, pitted cherries work wonderfully for this recipe. If using them, their syrup can be added to the drink or substituted for the sugar for an extra cherry kick.

Hot and fizzy: Coca-Cola Japan to launch first-ever pre-heated carbonated drinks in cans

Coca-Cola Japan have announced that next month they will be launching the innovative product they’ve been working on for about four years—the first-ever hot fizzy beverage that remains carbonated even when warmed up. The Canada Dry Hot Ginger Ale in four flavour varieties will be sold in Japan pre-heated through vending machines starting October 21.

Photo: Coca-Cola Japan launches the first-ever hot carbonated drink, Canada Dry Hot Ginger Ale to meet the demand during the colder months

Currently there is no specific details on the technological side of the bottling process or the material or coating of the cans, nor do the company shed light on whether hot carbonated products are planned to roll out in other international markets outside Japan. It is known that the new technology will keep carbon dioxide from escaping when the beverage is warmed to +55 C.

The new seasonal hot spicy beverages come in time when the warmed-in-the-can food & drinks market in growing in the U.S. However, as Daily Mail reports, the Coca-Cola’s new drinks will be heated up by vending machines, not by the self-heating cans «powered» via a chemical reaction inside the can, like the ones sold by the Hot Can company in the U.S.

Although the company claims Canada Dry Hot Ginger Ale to be the world’s first carbonated soda, another rival Japanese beverage manufacturer, Kirin, is also set to launch its own version called Kirin no Awa in November later this year.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (4 pound) whole chicken
  • ¼ cup butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • juice of 1 fresh lemon, divided
  • 1 (12 ounce) can lemon-lime soda (such as Sprite®)
  • 1 small whole onion, peeled
  • 1 squeezed lemon half

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Remove the giblets and rinse chicken inside and out with water. Pat dry with paper towels.

Stir together butter, brown sugar, garlic, salt and pepper, and half the lemon juice in a bowl. Rub the mixture over the entire chicken, including the cavity and beneath the skin.

Discard 1/2 of soda, leaving the rest in the can, and pour the remaining lemon juice into the can. Place the can on a baking sheet, and set the chicken upright on the can, inserting it into the cavity of the chicken. Plug the neck opening of the chicken with the onion and a squeezed lemon half to retain steam.

Roast the chicken in the preheated oven for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, to a minimum internal temperature of 180 degrees F (80 degrees C). Remove the chicken from the oven, discard the soda can, and cover chicken with a doubled sheet of aluminum foil to rest in a warm area for 10 minutes before slicing.


Canada Dry Bold Is Ginger Ale That's So Spicy And Flavorful That It's Blowing People Away

Even avid ginger ale fans have to admit there isn't always a TON of ginger flavor in the stuff. Sure, it tastes delicious even when it's not being sipped on an airplane, but some of us are also constantly chasing the spicy bite of chewing on a piece of ginger. Luckily Canada Dry recently released a product that scratches that very itch.

It's called Canada Dry Bold and it was spotted by Instagrammer @snackstalker in stores after making waves online in February. People have been pretty psyched about it because it promises lots and lots of bold ginger flavor and according to comments on snackstalker's post, it looks like it delivers just that.

"Love the ginger in this. Almost feels like jamaican ginger beer. If you&rsquore not accustomed to the spice in ginger this is 100% not for you," one person commented.

"It&rsquos strong. Burns at the end. But you get used to it. Starting to like it more and more," another said. So I guess if you're up for a gingery and, dare I say, bold challenge, this is certainly the drink for you. For the faint of heart? Not so much!


Watch the video: Moroccan Apple Beef Stew Recipe. ASMR Cooking Miniature Food (June 2022).